Transitions: From Legacy to Legendary: Thrive with APH CareerConnect

Editor’s Note: APH ConnectCenter and APH CareerConnect are thrilled to introduce Richard Rueda as APH CareerConnect’s new Digital Content Manager. Richard brings two decades of experience in transition and vocational rehabilitation experience to the ConnectCenter.  Learn about how APH CareerConnect supports and empowers blind and low-vision job seekers from high school through mid-career as they … Continued

Transitions: The Benefits of Working

Editor’s Note: Blind from birth, Karen Shrawder shares the importance of work experience opportunities for all youth, especially transition-age youth with visual impairments.  Thanks to high-quality educational and Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC) experiences, Karen is now sharing her passion for employment with others as a Work Incentives Practitioner with the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) The Benefits of Working.  This blog also appears … Continued

In Celebration of NDEAM: We Look Back, We Advocate, and We Plan for Gainful Employment

Hello, October, arguably the most magnificent month—not (only) because of the sensational scents, sights, and sips of fall, but (also) because October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, NDEAM for short. In celebration: We stop and remember. We educate others. We plan and gear up for the future. Why? Because, as is the 2021 NDEAM … Continued

Empowered to Work with Your Visually Impaired Child’s Medical Professionals

You + your child’s ophthalmologist + the pediatrician + any necessary therapists + medical specialists who manage any chronic or acute problems = your child’s robust medical professional team. You are a key member. Yet, it isn’t uncommon for parents to feel void of expertise and, therefore, to take a passive role or back seat … Continued

Empowered to Work with Your Visually Impaired Child’s Medical Professionals

You + your child’s ophthalmologist + the pediatrician + any necessary therapists + medical specialists who manage any chronic or acute problems = your child’s robust medical professional team. You are a key member. Yet, it isn’t uncommon for parents to feel void of expertise and, therefore, to take a passive role or back seat … Continued

The Indelible Impact of Louis Braille

When I decided to go back to school to become a teacher of students with visual impairments, I shared my decision with a friend and teacher’s assistant in special education for over 21 years. While her class is not specifically for students with visual impairments, she has always made a point to read the story … Continued

A Fun, Festive Holiday Take on the Expanded Core Curriculum

"It’s the most wonderful time of the year," and with a little intentionality, that can be the truth! This season needn’t be about expensive gifts but about what’s far more important… using the additional time off from work and school to reconnect with family, enjoying each other while creating lifelong memories and traditions. This year … Continued

National Disability Employment Awareness Month and Preparing Your Son or Daughter for Work

"Amelia," I ask my six-year-old daughter, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" "An artist—the abstract kind—so I can paint what I want," she replies. Her answer is ever-changing, and I am ever-asking. I want her to recognize she has the power to make career decisions, and she can take inventory of … Continued

Provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Your Son or Daughter with a Visual Impairment

This time each year we celebrate the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Each year—is that really necessary? YES! The ADA is the United States of America’s first comprehensive civil rights law protecting people with disabilities from discrimination. I know you’d agree—that can’t be over-celebrated! Provisions of the ADA And just what are … Continued

My Experience As a Summer Transition Specialist with Blind and Visually Impaired Teens

Ten years ago to the day (at the time of writing) I nervously walked into my first career-job. I was hired for the summer to plan and implement a summer program for students ages 14 to 22 with visual impairments. I knew “career preparation” was my number one goal for the group; with this in … Continued